New Peugeot 308 2022 review

New Peugeot 308 2022 review

Category : ,

Peugeot’s all-new 308 feels even more like a premium product, in keeping with the brand’s push upmarket. The French hatch has plenty in its armoury to trouble the likes of the VW Golf and Ford Focus, not to mention the many SUVs that have stolen sales over the past decade. But an awkward driving position and a lack of interior space slightly undermine the comfort, refinement and technology that the 308 offers.

The humble family hatchback has fallen out of favour with buyers craving an SUV, but all the major brands still have something to offer in the segment – not least because hatchbacks still sell in reasonable numbers. Which is why Peugeot has introduced a new 308. We’re driving the 1.2-litre PureTech here, which is likely to be the best-selling model.

We won’t dwell on the car’s looks for too long, although Peugeot has worked hard to give the 308 a distinctive style that makes some of its competitors look a tad dull. The firm’s trademark ‘fang’ daytime running lights sit astride pinched LED headlights that flow into the grille, and there are plenty of creases and slashes in the bodywork heading to the rear, which features ‘three-claw’ rear lights.

It all looks very premium, and this feel continues inside, with our GT Premium-spec car boasting a classy mix of fabric, piano-black plastic and man-made leather.

There are plenty of storage bins dotted around, too, although you’ll lose a tiny bit of room underneath the armrest in the hybrid models. Boot space also shrinks should you choose the hybrid, from a decent 412 litres to just 361 litres.

The latest 308 is based on the same EMP2 platform as the previous-generation car, plus many other models in the Stellantis group. However, while the platform offers some flexibility in layout, rear legroom in the 308 is cramped if you’re sitting behind someone tall. Thick C-pillars make it feel a bit claustrophobic in the back, too.

GT Premium models offer heated and electrically adjustable seats as standard. You also get Peugeot’s Drive Assist Pack Plus with lane positioning and adaptive cruise control, along with a 360-degree parking camera, lane assist and heated front seats with massaging function.

There’s a 10-inch digital dash and a 10.1-inch touchscreen, below which are Peugeot’s ‘i-Toggles’ that act as shortcuts to certain menus. They’re big and easy to use on the move, but sometimes you can accidentally press them if you rest your hand to use the main screen.

It all works relatively well, with decent graphics and responses, plus lots of features. But the i-Cockpit set-up means you have to sit quite high up so you can see the full driver’s display, otherwise some information will be completely blocked off by the flat-topped steering wheel.

On the move, the standard auto box delivers smooth shifts. The 128bhp 1.2 PureTech petrol engine isn’t especially pokey meaning a 0-62mph time of 9.7 seconds, so performance is best described as adequate, feeling lethargic at times. However it’s relatively quiet both around town and at motorway speeds.

The small steering wheel does give the 308 a sporty feel, but while the rack itself is quick and direct, there’s not a tremendous amount of feedback.

Peugeot has managed to mix sportiness with a comfortable ride, too. There’s plenty of grip and not much body roll, while even on the largest 18-inch wheels it glides relatively well over rough roads.

The 308 range starts from £24,635, but you’ll want to move to at least Allure Premium, which starts at £27,385, to really make the most of the Peugeot’s classy interior. Granted, most will be looking for a finance deal, and the Peugeot 308 looks even better on this front.

Based on an annual limit of 10,000 miles, an Allure Premium model will cost £285 per month over 48 months with a £5,000 deposit – a similarly specced Golf will cost £300. Step up to this high-spec GT Premium version, and you’ll be looking at £358, which still looks like reasonably good value.

Source : Autoexpress.co.uk
Tags :
Volkswagen Tiguan Allspace review

Volkswagen Tiguan Allspace review

Category : Best cars, Car News

The new Allspace is Volkswagen’s attempt to leverage more from the Tiguan [..]

Citroen e-Berlingo: long-term test review

Citroen e-Berlingo: long-term test review

Category : Best cars, Car News

Our Citroen is ticking most boxes. Its quirky styling divides opinion, but [..]

New Skoda Karoq 1.5 TSI SE L 2022 review

New Skoda Karoq 1.5 TSI SE L 2022 review

Category : Best cars, Newsletter

The SUV market moves quickly and it’s a testament to the Skoda [..]

New Volkswagen ID.5 GTX 2022 review

New Volkswagen ID.5 GTX 2022 review

Category : Best cars, Car News

Like the ID.4 GTX, this performance-trimmed ID.5 is lacking thrills. It isn’t [..]

New Volkswagen ID.5 2022 review

New Volkswagen ID.5 2022 review

Category : Best cars, Car Reviews

The Volkswagen ID.5 inherits both the ID.4’s good and not-so-good aspects, resulting [..]

New Aston Martin V12 Vantage 2022 review

New Aston Martin V12 Vantage 2022 review

Category : Car Reviews, Newsletter

The last and final version of the V12 Vantage looks amazing and [..]

Suzuki Jimny (2018-2020) review

Suzuki Jimny (2018-2020) review

Category : Car News, Car Reviews

The Suzuki Jimny remains a niche player in a market dominated by [..]

Jeep Wrangler review

Jeep Wrangler review

Category : Best cars, Car Reviews

The Jeep Wrangler is a four-wheel drive icon that’s better than ever [..]